Coping with Anxiety

Coping with Anxiety

While some stress can give us more drive or motivation to succeed, higher levels of anxiety can feel paralyzing and keep us from living the way we want and achieving our goals.

Author: Emily Duke
Coping with Anxiety

Stress and anxiety are parts of life that affect us all. Whether we’re giving a speech in class, going on a first date, or trying something new for the first time, we all experience jitters or nervousness. While some stress can give us more drive or motivation to succeed, higher levels of anxiety can feel paralyzing and keep us from living the way we want and achieving our goals.

A good rule of thumb for deciding how anxiety is impacting your life is to ask yourself a few questions:

  • Is your anxiety keeping you from doing things you really want to do?
  • Is anxiety taking up a large part of your day—are you nervous or worrying more often than not?
  • Do you have trouble controlling your worrying?
  • Do you have other symptoms of anxiety, such as: restlessness, feeling tired more easily, difficulty concentrating, being easily annoyed or irritated, muscle tension, or difficulty sleeping?

If those symptoms are common for you, anxiety may be holding you back from living the life you want. Sometimes anxiety can escalate into panic disorders, which involve either expected or unexpected panic attacks. During a panic attack, a person may feel shortness of breath, pounding heart, chest pain or discomfort, sweating, fear of losing control or dying, nausea, and trembling. A panic attack can be a frightening and very upsetting experience. Whether you experience panic attacks or not, anxiety can feel exhausting and overwhelming. The good news is—counseling can help.

If you’re feeling out of control and don’t know what to do, remember you’re not alone. Anxiety disorders affect approximately 40 million American adults each year, and women are 40% more likely to be affected. Anxiety disorders are among the most commonly diagnosed in the country, and they’re highly treatable. There are many tools and techniques for dealing with anxiety, and talking with a counselor can identify the cause of your anxiety and the best ways to combat it. If you think counseling can help you work through anxiety, give our intake coordinator a call.

We’d love to help.